Measuring progress

Knowing how many people are riding their bikes, why they ride, where they ride and how often they ride is important to help us understand what will grow cycling even further across our state. This baseline of data will enable us to track our progress over time in embedding cycling into Queensland’s transport system, culture, communities and economy.

The Queensland State of Cycling Report will be published every two years so that we can measure progress towards the five key objectives of the Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017—2027.


The graph shows the percentage of the population of selected regional areas in 2015 that cycle in a typical month. All of the selected regions showed cycling participation rates above the Queensland average of 22.1%, including Mackay at 25.2%, 3.1% above the average, Cairns at 29.7%, 7.6% above the average, and Gladstone at 23.1%, 1% above the Queensland average. Source: Austroads. 2015. National Cycling Participation Survey: Cairns, Gladstone, Mackay. Sydney. Unpublished reports prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
The graph shows the percentage of the population of selected regional areas in 2015 that cycle in a typical month. All of the selected regions showed cycling participation rates above the Queensland average of 22.1%, including Mackay at 25.2%, 3.1% above the average, Cairns at 29.7%, 7.6% above the average, and Gladstone at 23.1%, 1% above the Queensland average. Source: Austroads. 2015. National Cycling Participation Survey: Cairns, Gladstone, Mackay. Sydney. Unpublished reports prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
On average, every one dollar invested in cycling infrastructure returns almost five dollars to Queensland in health benefits, reduced traffic congestion and other benefits. Source: Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Queensland Cycle Infrastructure Investment Strategy 2016-26 and Business Case. Brisbane. Unpublished report.

Our five key objectives:

Objective 1: More cycling, more often in Queensland.

Knowing how many people are riding their bikes, why they ride, where they ride and how often they ride is important to help us understand what will grow cycling even further across our state.

To track our progress, we will measure:
Baseline
Percentage of Queenslanders who ride a bicycle in a typical week
16.6%
Percentage of Queensland children who ride a bicycle in a typical week
51.5% (under 10)
38.9% (10-17 years)
Proportion of cyclists who are female
38.0%
Proportion of cyclists who ride for transport
 39.1%

Baseline data source: Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney.

Objective 2: Cycle networks that are complete, connected and integrated with other transport modes.

People are more likely to cycle for transport or recreation when there are safe, connected and direct routes to ride on.

To track our progress, we will measure:
Baseline
Number of kilometres of principal cycle network built as part of the Cycling Infrastructure Program
444.6 kilometres
Percentage of trips to public transport undertaken by bicycle
1.1%1
Percentage of public transport stations with bicycle facilities*
51% secure bicycle parking
52% unsecured bicycle parking

*Includes Translink Bus Stations, Busway Stations, Brisbane Ferry Terminals, CityCat Terminals, Gold Coast Light Rail and Citytrain. A station may accommodate both types of bicycle parking facilities, figures should be considered separately.

1Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. South-East Queensland Household Travel Survey 2009-2012. Brisbane.

Objective 3: Positive perceptions of cycling throughout Queensland.

Improving people’s perceptions of cycling, especially among other road users, is essential to increasing the number of people who cycle.

To track our progress, we will measure:
Baseline
Percentage of cyclists who are comfortable riding in their area
66%1
Percentage of cyclists who feel conditions are improving in their area
34%2
Percentage of drivers with a good knowledge of cycling related road rules*
44%3
Percentage of drivers with positive perceptions of cyclists**
58%4

*Average results from four questions asked on knowledge of cycling road rules
**Average results from four questions asked on driver perceptions of cyclists
1 Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney.
ibid.
Market and Communications Research. 2016. Road Safety Perceptions and Attitudes survey (RSPAT). Brisbane.
ibid.

Objective 4: Cycling helping the Queensland economy to prosper.

We know well-planned cycling infrastructure pays itself off in health benefits and reduced traffic congestion. As part of the Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017 – 2027, we are investigating the range of benefits of cycling to Queensland businesses and the overall economy.

To track our progress, we will measure:
Baseline
Number of kilometres of constructed rail trails
226 kilometres
Number of attendees at major events*
 11,220

*For the three largest cycling events held in Queensland by Bicycle Queensland, Cycling Queensland and Mountain Bike Australia.

Objective 5: A strong evidence base that guides decision making about cycling.

Collecting and understanding data about who is riding, why they ride, when they ride and where they ride is helping to ensure our investments in cycling infrastructure and programs are targeted and working well.

To track our progress, we will measure:
Baseline
Number of monitoring points on the Principal Cycle Network*
18 permanent
66 temporary
Number of collected monitoring points released as open data sets**
14 permanent

* This measure is for Department of Transport and Main Roads monitoring points.
** Open data sets are for data collected from the Department of Transport and Main Roads monitoring points.

In 2017, 802 100 Queenslanders rode their bike in a typical week (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).  31.4% of these were female and 68.6% were male (Centre for Transport, Energy and Environment. 2016. Queensland Transport Facts 2016. Brisbane). Queenslanders travelled 348 million kilometres by bicycle in 2015, a 46% increase compared to the kilometres cycled in 2001 (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). The most common reasons Queensland adults cycle are: exercise and fitness, just for fun and for travel to work. 10, 237 kilometres of Principal Cycle Network was identified and mapped covering 48 local government areas, for 98.9% of Queenslanders. More than $211 million has been invested into safe cycling through the cycling Infrastructure Program, creating 444.6 kilometres of cycleways. Cycling tourism and events boost the Queensland economy. 226 kilometres of rail trails have been built. Major cycling events bring thousands of visitors to Queensland every year.
In 2017, 802 100 Queenslanders rode their bike in a typical week (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).  31.4% of these were female and 68.6% were male (Centre for Transport, Energy and Environment. 2016. Queensland Transport Facts 2016. Brisbane). Queenslanders travelled 348 million kilometres by bicycle in 2015, a 46% increase compared to the kilometres cycled in 2001 (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). The most common reasons Queensland adults cycle are: exercise and fitness, just for fun and for travel to work. 10, 237 kilometres of Principal Cycle Network was identified and mapped covering 48 local government areas, for 98.9% of Queenslanders. More than $211 million has been invested into safe cycling through the cycling Infrastructure Program, creating 444.6 kilometres of cycleways. Cycling tourism and events boost the Queensland economy. 226 kilometres of rail trails have been built. Major cycling events bring thousands of visitors to Queensland every year.

Continue exploring our priorities for cycling in Queensland

Queensland Cycling Strategy suite

Queensland
Cycling Action Plan 2017-2019

Our actions for the next two years

Queensland
State of Cycling Report 2017

Monitoring our progress every two years