Infographics

Below is a selection of  infographics taken from the Queensland Cycling Strategy 2017 — 2027 and from the Queensland State of Cycling Report 2017  which will be updated every two years. We encourage you to share these infographics on social media and on your own website. To download them simply 'right-click + save as'.

When using these infographics, please credit Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Cycling Strategy and link to http://blog.tmr.qld.gov.au/cycling/infographics/.

In 2017, 802 100 Queenslanders rode their bike in a typical week (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).  31.4% of these were female and 68.6% were male (Centre for Transport, Energy and Environment. 2016. Queensland Transport Facts 2016. Brisbane). Queenslanders travelled 348 million kilometres by bicycle in 2015, a 46% increase compared to the kilometres cycled in 2001 (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). The most common reasons Queensland adults cycle are: exercise and fitness, just for fun and for travel to work. 10, 237 kilometres of Principal Cycle Network was identified and mapped covering 48 local government areas, for 98.9% of Queenslanders. More than $211 million has been invested into safe cycling through the cycling Infrastructure Program, creating 444.6 kilometres of cycleways. Cycling tourism and events boost the Queensland economy. 226 kilometres of rail trails have been built. Major cycling events bring thousands of visitors to Queensland every year.
In 2017, 802 100 Queenslanders rode their bike in a typical week (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).  31.4% of these were female and 68.6% were male (Centre for Transport, Energy and Environment. 2016. Queensland Transport Facts 2016. Brisbane). Queenslanders travelled 348 million kilometres by bicycle in 2015, a 46% increase compared to the kilometres cycled in 2001 (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). The most common reasons Queensland adults cycle are: exercise and fitness, just for fun and for travel to work. 10, 237 kilometres of Principal Cycle Network was identified and mapped covering 48 local government areas, for 98.9% of Queenslanders. More than $211 million has been invested into safe cycling through the cycling Infrastructure Program, creating 444.6 kilometres of cycleways. Cycling tourism and events boost the Queensland economy. 226 kilometres of rail trails have been built. Major cycling events bring thousands of visitors to Queensland every year.

 

Current participation rates

In 2017, 802 100 Queenslanders rode their bike in a typical week. Source: Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney.
In 2017, 802 100 Queenslanders rode their bike in a typical week. Source: Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney.

 


Cycling participation of Queenslanders declines with increasing age. In 2015, cycling participation in the up to nine-year old cohort is 46%, in the 10 to 17-year- old cohort it is 32%, in the 18 to 29-year- old cohort it is 16%, in the 30 to 49-year- old cohort it is 9% and for people aged 50 years and older it is only 3%  (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).
Cycling participation of Queenslanders declines with increasing age. In 2015, cycling participation in the up to nine-year old cohort is 46%, in the 10 to 17-year- old cohort it is 32%, in the 18 to 29-year- old cohort it is 16%, in the 30 to 49-year- old cohort it is 9% and for people aged 50 years and older it is only 3%  (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).

Cycling participation in selected regional areas

The graph shows the percentage of the population of selected regional areas in 2015 that cycle in a typical month. All of the selected regions showed cycling participation rates above the Queensland average of 22.1%, including Mackay at 25.2%, 3.1% above the average, Cairns at 29.7%, 7.6% above the average, and Gladstone at 23.1%, 1% above the Queensland average. Source: Austroads. 2015. National Cycling Participation Survey: Cairns, Gladstone, Mackay. Sydney. Unpublished reports prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
The graph shows the percentage of the population of selected regional areas in 2015 that cycle in a typical month. All of the selected regions showed cycling participation rates above the Queensland average of 22.1%, including Mackay at 25.2%, 3.1% above the average, Cairns at 29.7%, 7.6% above the average, and Gladstone at 23.1%, 1% above the Queensland average (Austroads. 2015. National Cycling Participation Survey: Cairns, Gladstone, Mackay. Sydney. Unpublished reports prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads).

Why more cycling, more often?

39% of Queensland adults are not getting enough physical activity.  Source: Queensland Health. 2016. The Health of Queenslanders Report, 2016. Brisbane.
39% of Queensland adults are not getting enough physical activity (Queensland Health. 2016. The Health of Queenslanders Report, 2016. Brisbane).

 


Distances up to 5km are ideal for cycling, but 79% of all journeys in South East Queensland are made by private vehicle. Source: Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. South-East Queensland Household Travel Survey 2009-2012. Brisbane.
Distances up to 5km are ideal for cycling, but 79% of all journeys in South East Queensland are made by private vehicle (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Queensland Household Travel Survey 2009-2012. Brisbane).

The Benefits of Cycling. 39% of Queensland adults are not getting enough physical activity. Riding a bike to work or school can be an easy way to incorporate regular exercise into your busy day. Nine out of ten adults cycle because it’s good for their health. Riding is a fun social activity for Queenslanders of all ages. It can also improve your mental wellbeing by reducing feelings of stress, anxiety and depression. Cycling reduces your risk of serious illnesses like heart disease, type-two diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. The more people there are cycling, the safer it becomes. Well planned cycling infrastructure pays itself off in health benefits and reduced congestion. Queensland Health. 2016. The Health of Queenslanders Report, 2016. Brisbane. Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. 2006. Australia’s Health 2006. AIHW Catalogue AUS73. World Health Organisation. 2002. A physically active life through everyday transport with a special focus on children and older people and examples and approaches from Europe. Denmark. New Zealand Transport Agency. 2016. Benefits of investing in cycling in New Zealand communities. CDM Research. 2016. Measuring the benefits of active travel. Melbourne. Unpublished report prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads.More people cycling reduces Queensland’s carbon footprint.
The Benefits of Cycling:
39% of Queensland adults are not getting enough physical activity (Queensland Health. 2016. The Health of Queenslanders Report, 2016. Brisbane). Riding a bike to work or school can be an easy way to incorporate regular exercise into your busy day.
Nine out of ten adults cycle because it’s good for their health (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane).
Riding is a fun social activity for Queenslanders of all ages.
It can also improve your mental wellbeing by reducing feelings of stress, anxiety and depression (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. 2006. Australia’s Health 2006. AIHW Catalogue AUS73.).
Cycling reduces your risk of serious illnesses like heart disease, type-two diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity (World Health Organisation. 2002. A physically active life through everyday transport with a special focus on children and older people and examples and approaches from Europe. Denmark.).
The more people there are cycling, the safer it becomes (New Zealand Transport Agency. 2016. Benefits of investing in cycling in New Zealand communities.).
Well planned cycling infrastructure pays itself off in health benefits and reduced congestion (CDM Research. 2016. Measuring the benefits of active travel. Melbourne. Unpublished report prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads).
More people cycling reduces Queensland’s carbon footprint (Woodcock, J., Edwards, P., et al. 2009. Public health benefits of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions: urban land transport. The Lancet, 374(9705), 1930-1943).


 

On average, every one dollar invested in cycling infrastructure returns almost five dollars to Queensland in health benefits, reduced traffic congestion and other benefits. Source: Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Queensland Cycle Infrastructure Investment Strategy 2016-26 and Business Case. Brisbane. Unpublished report.
On average, every one dollar invested in cycling infrastructure returns almost five dollars to Queensland in health benefits, reduced traffic congestion and other benefits (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Queensland Cycle Infrastructure Investment Strategy 2016-26 and Business Case. Brisbane. Unpublished report).

 

Why and how do people cycle?

The most common reasons Queensland adults cycle are: for exercise and fitness, just for fun and for travel to work. Source: Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane.
The most common reasons Queensland adults cycle are: for exercise and fitness, just for fun and for travel to work (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane).

 


The most important motivations for women to cycle are: health and fitness, fun and enjoyment and getting outside. Source: Heart Foundation. 2013. Women and Cycling Survey. Brisbane.
The most important motivations for women to cycle are: health and fitness, fun and enjoyment and getting outside (Heart Foundation. 2013. Women and Cycling Survey. Brisbane).

 

 

 


Eight out of ten cyclists in Queensland ride regularly for recreation (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney). Health is the number one motivation for men and women (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). 61% of weekday cycle trips are to work or education (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Queensland Household Travel Survey 2011. Brisbane).
Eight out of ten cyclists in Queensland ride regularly for recreation (Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney). Health is the number one motivation for men and women (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). 61% of weekday cycle trips are to work or education (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Queensland Household Travel Survey 2011. Brisbane).

 


People who want to start cycling rate physically separated cycleways as their number one priority to encourage cycling (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). 97% of Queenslanders reported feeling safe riding on physically separated cycleways (Market & Communications Research. 2011. Sustainable Transport Survey Report One - Cycling) 74% of current bicycle riders rated more off-road cycleways as a high priority to encourage cycling (Unpublished report prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads. 13 Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).
People who want to start cycling rate physically separated cycleways as their number one priority to encourage cycling (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2016. Results of Queensland Cycling Strategy community consultation. Brisbane). 97% of Queenslanders reported feeling safe riding on physically separated cycleways (Market & Communications Research. 2011. Sustainable Transport Survey Report One - Cycling) 74% of current bicycle riders rated more off-road cycleways as a high priority to encourage cycling (Unpublished report prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads. 3. Austroads. 2017. National Cycling Participation Survey: Queensland. Sydney).

 


60% of Australian women would like to cycle more than they currently do. To encourage them to cycle more, women would like: more physically separated cycling facilities, more bike lanes and better lighting. Source: Heart Foundation. 2013. Women and Cycling Survey. Brisbane.
60% of Australian women would like to cycle more than they currently do. To encourage them to cycle more, women would like: more physically separated cycling facilities, more bike lanes and better lighting (Heart Foundation. 2013. Women and Cycling Survey. Brisbane).

 

Investment in infrastructure

10, 237 kilometres of Principal Cycle Network was identified and mapped, covering 48 local government areas.

 


 

Between 2011 and 2017, the number of people using new cycling infrastructure on the principal cycle network grew significantly.  In 2011, average daily counts were: 991 for the Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 134 for the Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 128 for the the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. In 2013, average daily counts were: 1,235 for Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 145 for the Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 165 for the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. In 2015, average daily counts were: 1,412 for Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 175 for Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 159 for the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. In 2017, average daily counts were: 1,598 for Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 193 for Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 209 for the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. This data shows that from 2011 to 2017, Veloway 1 experienced a 61% growth in usage; Aeroglen Cycleway in Cairns a 44% growth and the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane experienced a 63% growth in usage. Source: Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2017. Automated Bicycle Counts. Brisbane
Between 2011 and 2017, the number of people using new cycling infrastructure on the principal cycle network grew significantly. In 2011, average daily counts were: 991 for the Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 134 for the Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 128 for the the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. In 2013, average daily counts were: 1,235 for Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 145 for the Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 165 for the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. In 2015, average daily counts were: 1,412 for Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 175 for Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 159 for the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. In 2017, average daily counts were: 1,598 for Veloway 1 in Brisbane, 193 for Aeroglen Drive Cycleway in Cairns and 209 for the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane. This data shows that from 2011 to 2017, Veloway 1 experienced a 61% growth in usage; Aeroglen Cycleway in Cairns a 44% growth and the Gateway Bridge in Brisbane experienced a 63% growth in usage (Department of Transport and Main Roads. 2017. Automated Bicycle Counts. Brisbane).

 

From 2006 to 2017, the CIP has delivered 411 projects, 444.6 kilometres of cycling infrastructure, a $211 million investment to expand and connect the cycle network and $182.5 million will be invested in cycling infrastructure under the CIP over 4 years to 2020.
From 2006 to 2017, the CIP has delivered 411 projects, 444.6 kilometres of cycling infrastructure, a $211 million investment to expand and connect the cycle network and $182.5 million will be invested in cycling infrastructure under the CIP over 4 years to 2020. In 2016, more than one million Queenslanders lived within one kilometre of cycling infrastructure funded under the CIP, compared with just over 6,000 in 2006. In 2006 6,153 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2007 46,314 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2008 129,533 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2009 306,609 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2010 521,147 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2011 690,113 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2012 741,003 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2013 850,141 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2014 920,730 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2015 970,432 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure. In 2016 1,048,335 people lived within one kilometre of CIP-funded infrastructure.

Benefit-cost ratios for selected infrastructure projects show for every dollar invested there are positive returns to the Queensland economy. This covers quantifiable benefits and costs following the Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines – M4 Active Travel. The Biggera Creek Greenway on the Gold Coast returned $3.80 for every $1 spent. The David Low Way Bicycle Lanes on the Sunshine Coast returned $4.30 for every $1 spent. The Veloway 1 (Stage C) in Brisbane returned $5.40 for every $1 spent. The Cairns Northern Cycleway returned $7.4- for every $1 spent.
Benefit-cost ratios for selected infrastructure projects show for every dollar invested there are positive returns to the Queensland economy (CDM Research. 2016. Measuring the benefits of active travel. Melbourne. Unpublished report prepared for the Department of Transport and Main Roads).  This covers quantifiable benefits and costs following the Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines – M4 Active Travel (Transport and Infrastructure Council. 2016. Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines – M4 Active Travel, Commonwealth Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development, Canberra). The Biggera Creek Greenway on the Gold Coast returned $3.80 for every $1 spent. The David Low Way Bicycle Lanes on the Sunshine Coast returned $4.30 for every $1 spent. The Veloway 1 (Stage C) in Brisbane returned $5.40 for every $1 spent. The Cairns Northern Cycleway returned $7.40 for every $1 spent.

51% of public transport stations in Queensland have secure bicycle parking and 52% have bicycle rails or racks.  *This includes Translink Bus Stations, Busway Stations, Brisbane Ferry Terminals, CityCat Terminals, Gold Coast light rail and Citytrain. A station may accommodate both types of bicycle parking facilities, figures should be considered  separately.
51% of public transport stations in Queensland have secure bicycle parking and 52% have bicycle rails or racks. *This includes Translink Bus Stations, Busway Stations, Brisbane Ferry Terminals, CityCat Terminals, Gold Coast light rail and Citytrain. A station may accommodate both types of bicycle parking facilities, figures should be considered  separately.

 

 

Sharing our roads and positive perceptions of cycling

The minimum passing distance road rule keeps cyclists safe. When the speed limit is 60 km per hour or less, motorists must leave a gap of at least one metre when passing bicycle riders. When the speed limit is over 60 kilometres per hour, the gap must be at least one and a half metres.
The minimum passing distance road rule keeps cyclists safe. When the speed limit is 60 km per hour or less, motorists must leave a gap of at least one metre when passing bicycle riders. When the speed limit is over 60 kilometres per hour, the gap must be at least one and a half metres.

 


Since the introduction of the minimum passing distance rules, 73% of cyclists and 60% of drivers observed motorists giving bicycle riders more room when overtaking than they used to. Source: CARRS-Q. 2016. Evaluation of the Queensland minimum passing distances road rule, final report 2016. Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology.
Since the introduction of the minimum passing distance rules, 73% of cyclists and 60% of drivers observed motorists giving bicycle riders more room when overtaking than they used to (CARRS-Q. 2016. Evaluation of the Queensland minimum passing distances road rule, final report 2016. Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology).

As part of Bike Week 2016 the Great Brisbane Bike Ride attracted more than 2000 participants.
As part of Bike Week 2016 the Great Brisbane Bike Ride attracted more than 2000 participants.

In 2016, 645 people participated in the Paluma Push mountain bike event in the Paluma range near Townsville (<i>Event data provided by Mountain Bike Australia</i>).
In 2016, 645 people participated in the Paluma Push mountain bike event in the Paluma range near Townsville (Event data provided by Mountain Bike Australia).

 


 

Continue exploring our priorities for cycling in Queensland

Queensland Cycling Strategy suite

Queensland
Cycling Action Plan 2017-2019

Our actions for the next two years

Queensland
State of Cycling Report 2017

Monitoring our progress every two years